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Catastrophic flooding hits South Carolina, East Coast
Flood waters engulf a home in Columbia, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The rainstorm drenching the U.S. East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing many roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Flood waters engulf a home in Columbia, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The rainstorm drenching the U.S. East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing many roads because of floodwaters. Even though Hurricane Joaquin is tracking away from the United States, torrential rainfall continues to pound the East Coast.     
    
Heavy rain has brought historic, life-threatening flooding in many locations in South Carolina, including in Charleston and Columbia, where numerous rescues have been reported. Into Monday, a feed of rich tropical moisture from the Atlantic will continue to unleash heavy rainfall on the Southeast, especially in parts of South Carolina and southeastern North Carolina.      
    
Gov. Nikki Haley urged the residents of South Carolina to stay safe, saying that the amount of rain in the low country was at its highest level in a 1,000 years and noted that the Congaree River was at its highest level since 1936. In eastern South Carolina and southeastern North Carolina, rainfall totals are predicted to range from 12 to 24 inches, nearly half of the normal rainfall for an entire year.
President Obama has already declared a state of emergency in South Carolina and ordered federal aid to help state and local efforts.

Despite rising flood risks, less than 7% of homes and high-risk properties are insured for this peril.

 

Posted 9:08 AM  View Comments

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